Tag Archives: city and islington college

Duramaney Kamara: actor in Boy

4 May

‘Boy’ at the Almeida is a ground-breaking show about what it feels like coming of age in austerity Britain. The play, written by Leo Butler, has a 27-strong cast of which 16 are making their stage debut, including an 18-year-old student from Islington, Duramaney Kamara. Interview by Nicola Baird

Duramaney Kamara - debut performance in Boy at the Almeida Theatre (c) Kwame Lestrade

Duramaney Kamara – debut performance in Boy at the Almeida Theatre. Whether you’ve seen the show or not you can join a young people’s free panel discussion this Thursday (5 May) with the writer. See how at the end of this interview.  (c) Kwame Lestrade

Duramaney Kamara is very different from Boy’s lost central character, Liam – and perhaps that’s no surprise when he admits that his mum was on stage when she was nine months pregnant, making him able to say “he was on stage before he was born!”. In fact it’s Duramaney, playing Lamari, who has just enough interest in track suited-Liam to give him a proper telling off (no one else seems to notice Liam). But as Duramaney wisely points out, “everything Lamari tells Liam he is saying to himself…”

The play has a host of characters Londoners will recognise – from mobile-addicted schoolgirls waiting for the bus home to non-English speaking road workers – so in his debut Duramaney also plays a teenage son in the doctor’s reception, toilet attendant, person in the crowd and Sainsbury’s worker.

It’s clear he’s chuffed to be on stage in his home borough, Islington. “Because it’s my first time on stage I thought doing the same thing every night I’d find boring. But it’s not! It’s new every night. It’s like life – you can’t get bored of life because you are living it,” he explains.

NEVER MISS AN ISLINGTON FACES: if you enjoy reading about people who live or work in Islington please follow this blog by email (see how on right hand panel). Fresh interviews are published once a week.

“We had 13 hour rehearsals,” says Duramaney explaining why it’s been so hard organise this interview when we meet on a Thursday lunchtime over an orange juice in the Almeida Café. For him life could be considered a bit less busy now that he is just doing a show every night at the same time as finishing off his final A level year studying Drama & Theatre Studies, Music and Music Tech at City and Islington College…

Clerkenwell Primary.

Clerkenwell Primary.

Duramaney lives with his mum and dad, both professional singers/musicians, just off Essex Road. He’s born and bred Islington: his early years were spent at Clerkenwell where he went to Clerkenwell Parochial Primary School on Amwell Street. “In year 3 or 4 we done a play at Little Angel,” says Duramaney. “We all had puppets and then my dad said I should do some drumming. I was shy but I did it…”

In fact Duramaney was only four years old when a bloke in a pub predicted he’d make a great trumpet player. “I was sitting in the Three Kings Pub, opposite St James’ Church, when someone gave me a cornet (a very basic trumpet) to hold. I started playing around with it and getting a sound,” he says, “so they got me a trumpet.”

Duramaney really likes to sing and MC, and as with all the instruments Duramaney plays – trumpet, piano, keyboard, guitar and percussion – he’s self-taught. “I tend to use my ears and then see if I can play it back,” he explains. His mum Basha Letsididi, a singer, originally from Botswana, taught him how to read music, but “I only recently started doing grades – I got a distinction in Grade 3 trumpet,” says Duramaney understandably proudly. He’s also had support from Richard Frostick from Islington Music Centre and his music teachers James Hunter at Bishop Douglass in Barnet, where he went to secondary school, and Jack Davis at City & Islington College, praising them both for “building my confidence.”

Music is a huge part of Duramaney’s life – after the show, and after his summer exams he hopes to spend a gap year doing “voice acting as well as other acting jobs” and working on his music projects. For now he has to be content with, “Our house being full of music. It’s either me playing my stuff – I listen to a lot of jazz, John Coltrane, Fela Kuti (from Nigeria) and I also play a lot of Bob Marley, Curtis Mayfield and perhaps oddly for a teenager I like classical music. Mum will be singing or rehearsing and Dad is either fixing or playing drums…”

The company of Boy at an Essex Road bus stop. (c) Kwame Lestrade

The company of Almeida Theatre’s Boy at an Essex Road bus stop. Duramaney Kamara is in a grey hoodie. (c) Kwame Lestrade

The play’s the thing
Boy is a bleak play, it’s had 4* and 5* reviews, but it is an uncompromising view of the struggles many poorly educated white British teenage boys find themselves in, and is as relevant to Islington as to Crystal Palace where the writer Leo Butler lives. Most of the play revolves around life at a bus stop using an ingenious moving travelator (like they have in Yo Sushi and airports). There are moments – especially the start – which are very funny, but the overall impression is that Liam hasn’t a chance. So Islington Faces was curious if Duramaney knew any Liams, and what he thought of the show’s Liam…

“I do like Liam. At a point in life everyone can be a Liam. There’s a lot of pressure and you have to hide it. Some people grow up without a healthy household and they have to grow up fast. With teenagers it’s all down to peer pressure. People need to prove something to someone to get a thumbs up from their peer group. If you look at gang culture, there’s pressure from someone older to do something for that thumbs up. Other people get that thumbs up for getting an A grade,” he says.

“For Liam he’s got no guidance. Even his vocabulary is really diminished – he repeats what other people say. It’s heart-breaking the way he looks to other people,” explains Duramaney.

Liam is the teenage boy who has fallen through every safety net. Even if most of the audience longs to help him find the resilience to clamber back up, Cameron’s Britain is unforgiving. You’ve got to get on and make it when the odds are so stacked against you – with minimal support from parents who may well be separated, working Zero Hour contracts, dealing with mental health issues or completely distracted by money and housing problems.

The Union Chapel has been called a Tardis. Here is one of the upstairs rooms used as the bar for shows. CAPTION It was built in 1877 (on the site of the too-small chapel erected in 1806). Impressive past worshipers include Asquith (Liberal PM, 1908-1916) and the poet John Betjeman’s mother. Betjeman’s involvement helped save it from demolition in 1982. Many worshippers came from both right and left.

The Union Chapel’s bar.

Places Duramaney Kamara likes in Islington
“Islington is supposed to be a prestigious borough, but the crime rate shows otherwise.”

  • Angel is a big hub for me. Everything is there and it’s a nice place to go. We eat at Bombay Burrito on 357 Goswell Road and Nandos at 324 Upper Street. Five Guys, 71 Upper Street, is expensive but there are some nice pizza shops.
  • Rosemary Gardens on the Islington-Hackney border is a nice place.
  • I like Union Chapel. I sang there with the Islington Music Centre choir. Great acoustics!
  • The Almeida is nice. I did a workshop last year with the college at the Almeida, during Oresteia, which was really brilliant.
  • You can go anywhere from Essex Road – I found this out on the day before my 18th party day and I realised there were buses for everyone. There’s the 38 to Victoria, 73 to Oxford Street, 56 to Leytonstone, 476 to Tottenham, 21 to Lewisham and the 76 to London Bridge…

Confidence
Duramaney has a very different energy to Liam or the characters he plays in Boy, and he’s clear that’s because: ‘I’ve been taught by my parents to be independent and not to rely on anyone else.” But he admits he felt undermined by not getting a place at the Brit School, the Guildhall or the Royal Academy of Music. Thankfully he’s also finding that overcoming adversity can make you stronger – “I’ve learnt that there’s always a way,” he says with a big smile explaining how he hopes to study at Leeds College of Music… and, just for the record, a class of Brit School students (who would have been in his year) have come to see Boy at the Almeida.

It’s an interesting irony that such a bleak play should be giving Duramaney Kamara – and so many talented young actors including Frankie Fox who plays the lead, Liam – such a great opportunity to perform on as famous a stage as the Almeida. And you can join in too by coming to the young people’s panel event on Thursday 5 May, from 6pm, to discuss the ideas raised in Boy.

Find out more about Duramaney Kamara via soundcloud
https://soundcloud.com/dlk_the-genius/sets/new-garden or @DLKtheGenius

Thursday 5 May, 6pm come to a panel for young people exploring the ideas raised in Boy. It’s free and can be booked online – http://www.almeida.co.uk/whats-on/answers-back/5-may-2016
• Facebook /almeidatheatre Twitter @AlmeidaTheatre
Boy by Leo Butler is at Almedia Theatre until 28 May. Sign up to the email list at almeida.co.uk

Over to you
If you’d like to nominate someone to be interviewed who grew up, lives or works in Islington, or suggest yourself, please let me know, via nicolabaird.green at gmail.com. Thank you.

If you liked this interview please SHARE on twitter or Facebook or join the Facebook group. Even better follow islingtonfacesblog.com (see menu top right) or follow me on twitter @nicolabairduk

This blog is inspired by Spitalfields Life written by the Gentle Author.

If you enjoyed this post you might like to look at the A-Z  index, or search by interviewee’s roles or Meet Islingtonians to find friends, neighbours and inspiration. Thanks for stopping by. Nicola

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David Gibson: Islington Society

21 Oct

Architect David Gibson moved to Islington as a student in 1965 – and is still living here. David is convinced that good planning and the design of buildings improves people’s lives, and is a committed chair of the influential Islington Society (find out more by attending the AGM on Thursday 12 November 2015). Interview by Nicola Baird

David Gibson, architect who chairs the influential Islington Society.

David Gibson, architect who chairs the influential Islington Society.

David Gibson – and his wife Mary Gibson, the well-known former Yerbury Primary School head teacher – have been transforming the lives of Islington people for years. Turns out they were childhood sweethearts.

David, an architect and founder of the David Gibson Architects based on Essex Road, is also chairman of the Islington Society, which helps to influence Islington town planning for the better.

NEVER MISS AN ISLINGTON FACES: if you enjoy reading about people who live or work in Islington please follow this blog by email (see how on right hand panel). Fresh interviews are published once a week. 

David first moved to Islington in 1965 while studying at University College.

“Most of the students lived in terrible, grotty bedsits in Barnsbury and Canonbury. They were slums, and there were plans to knock them down.” David’s student digs were in Beacon Hill, off Hillmarton Road, N7, but it wasn’t until the 1970s that he moved to Upper Holloway. The couple now live in Tufnell Park and their adult children Timothy and Helen are also based in Islington. “I am so lucky to have a good relationship with my children and have them both living within a five minute walk,” says David who met Mary when they were both at secondary schools (different ones) in Warrington. “We were introduced by the local parish priest who ran a philosophy club.”

Their charmed life had a huge hiccup in 2011 when they were involved in a head-on car collision while holidaying in Vermont. Mary had broken ribs and a punctured lung and missed the start of the Yerbury School winter term 2011/12, while David, then 63, suffered multiple fractures. But five years on he looks fit, well and looking forward to his upcoming US trip.

“For around 30 years we’ve spent a week in New York and three weeks in Vermont, staying with a friend Mary met as a young teacher in Islington at Ecclesbourne School in Canonbury (now closed),” through her regular class trips to the Children’s Library (now South Library) on Essex Road. http://www.islingtontribune.com/news/2011/sep/yerbury-school-head-mary-gibson-survives-car-crash-us

The long awaited pedestrian crossing over Holloway Road opposite Nags Head.

The long awaited pedestrian crossing over Holloway Road opposite Nags Head. David Gibson: “You go to Nag’s Head for the things you need. You go to Angel for the things you think you want.”

Why David Gibson loves Nag’s Head & hopes you do too

David Gibson has lived in Tufnell Park for 30 years . He’s also on the Nag’s Head Town Centre Management Group. As a result he’s a huge fan of the Nag’s Head:

  • An independent treasure for coffee and meals on Holloway Road (opposite Argos).

    An independent treasure for coffee and meals on Holloway Road (opposite Argos) now renamed Ekko.

    The Nag’s Head is brilliant but under rated. You go to Nag’s Head for the things you need, and you go to Angel for the things you think you want.” There’s nowhere in the Angel where you can buy a nut cracker or ordinary household equipment but at Nags Head you’ve got Selbys, 384-400 Holloway Road, N7.

  • Until about 1920 Nag’s Head was the principal centre of Islington with three theatres and all sorts of shops. It’s still geographically central.
  • I like to go to Ekko, formerly Amici restaurant, 367 Holloway Road, N7.
  • Joyce Pollaya, who was the Nag’s Head town centre manager, and on the Nag’s Head Town Centre Management Group, campaigned for 20 years to get a pedestrian crossing going east-west over Holloway Road (between Parkhurst Road-Camden Road/Tollington Way). It ws finally opened in August 2015. The west side, where the restaurants are, has very wide pavements so there can be more activity there, like tables outside the cafes. Previously the economic side seemed to be on the east side, where Selby and Morrisons and the other big stores are.
  • Find out more about the Nag’s Head Town Centre Strategy (adopted May 2007 by Islington Council) here 

Islington Society
As an architect he has worked all over the place, but it’s where he lives that David has focussed his volunteering efforts.

“I’m passionate about the Islington Society. It’s a local campaigning organisation set up to safeguard and improve the quality of life in Islington. Normally this sort of group would be combative and against things but I think to make a change and a difference you need to be able to work with the council, as well as against,” says David who has been an Islington Society member since 1995. “That’s why we have good and strong links with the heads of department. In Islington they are really impressive people who know what they are doing and are also committed to making Islington a better place.”

The Islington Society was founded in 1960. “It was started to try and stop the demolition of Union Square for the huge Packington Estate, N1. That was 60 years ago and it’s interesting that as the Packington Estate was demolished we didn’t campaign to stop that. But the new Packington Estate is architecturally very good. I particularly like the social housing which was built first and has one of the best ends of the estate which overlooks the canal,” says David.

David Gibson has strong views about the way Angel looks, which is one reason he is on the Angel Town xx

David Gibson has strong views about the way Angel looks, which is one reason he is on the Angel Town Centre board.

5 impressive Islington buildings (& a mistake) picked by David Gibson

  • “The Islington Society runs an annual architecture award. It’s been going for 20 years and was called the Geoffrey Gribble Conservation Award. Unusually the awards go to the building – a 10 inch engraved bronze plaque – rather than the architects. The first plaques were made by an Islington sign maker in Amwell Street, who has now moved out to Kent. In 2014, the award now sponsored by Jack Morris and the Business Design Centre, went to the refurbishment on the corner of Rosebery Avenue and Farringdon Road. We’ve given the award to Ironmonger Row Baths and to the road bridge over the canal in King’s Cross too.”
  • In 1789 this was the site of the Gun pub. It was rebuilt in 1834 (when the address was 18 Pierpoint Row) and renamed the Duke of Sussex in honour of George III's sixth son, Prince Augustus Frederic (1773-1845) from whom Frederick's takes its name. You can still see the original staircase and two murals on the external brickwork.

    Frederick’s: In 1789 this was the site of the Gun pub. It was rebuilt in 1834 (when the address was 18 Pierpoint Row) and renamed the Duke of Sussex in honour of George III’s sixth son, Prince Augustus Frederic (1773-1845) from whom Frederick’s takes its name. You can still see the original staircase and two murals on the external brickwork.

    “I often go to Frederick’s, in Camden Passage, not only to enjoy the wonderful food but also because I’m a member of the Angel Town Centre board which meets there. In the 1970s the Angel was the most awful place. It was very run down. Now look at it! Campaigning by the Islington Society has helped preserve the best features and we are working to improve the places that are, shall we say not so good, such as the Bank of Scotland eyesore on the Angel tube side of Islington High Street.”  See Islington Faces interview with Frederick’s manager, Matt Segal, here.

  • “The N4 Library building, which is attached to City & Islington College’s Blackstock Road campus for adult learners is one of my favourite buildings.”
  • “All the City and Islington campuses are impressive. Their Camden Road building was designed by Wilkinson Eyre, an Islington based practice in EC1.”
  • City & Islington College's Camden Road campus.

    City & Islington College’s Camden Road campus.

    David Gibson Architects ran the competition with RIBA to select architects for City and Islington College’s 6th form centre at Goswell Road with Tom Jupp, the then Principal of the College and Jack Morris, the Chair of Governors, who had the vision to use a really good architect – it makes such a big difference.  The building was by Van Heynigen & Haward. City and Islington College is a great instituion, its Director, Frank McCoughlin, has just been deservedly knighted in the Queen’s Birthday honours.

  • “I wasn’t impressed by the Building Schools for the Future programme (which saw Holloway, St Aloysius and Highbury Grove being rebuilt and other schools in the borough being refurbished). Those of us longer in the tooth warned that schools would be locked into these deals permanently (25 years) and it would be expensive, which, funnily enough, turns out to be the case.”

Although he admits there are still plenty of things the Islington Society is vehemently against including the proposals for the Mount Pleasant Post Office site at Rosbery Avenue; removing trees from Faringdon Road and Cross-Rail’s desire to knock down listed buildings on the west side of Islington High Street. We find that the councillors are always very concerned about housing and education but don’t see planning as a front line service. But the quality of housing, educational buildings and the life we lead is to do with the physical environment we live in,” he adds with absolute conviction.

And that’s why a busy architect like David Gibson had put so much time into envisioning the ways Islington could be better. His sadly missed predecessor, Harley Sherlock, helped put the Islington Society on the campaign map. Now it is David and the Islington Society members who work so effectively to ensure the borough’s historic fabric is preserved; new buildings are of a high design standard; better public transport and priority for people on foot, bike and public transport as well as building better links between residents, officials and councillors. For anyone in Islington that makes the £8 a year membership an absolute bargain.

Over to you
If you’d like to nominate someone to be interviewed who grew up, lives or works in Islington, or suggest yourself, please let me know, via nicolabaird.green at gmail.com. Thank you.

If you liked this interview please SHARE on twitter or Facebook or join the Facebook group. Even better follow islingtonfacesblog.com (see menu top right) or follow me on twitter @nicolabairduk

This blog is inspired by Spitalfields Life written by the Gentle Author.

If you enjoyed this post you might like to look at the A-Z  index, or search by interviewee’s roles or Meet Islingtonians to find friends, neighbours and inspiration. Thanks for stopping by. Nicola

 

Hugh Grover: estate agent

2 Apr

Everyone on Islington Faces Blog has a story.  Estate agent Hugh Grover has spent 50 years this April (2014) in Islington. Here he explains what he loves about the area – and it’s not just house prices or Arsenal.  Interview by Nicola Baird

Hugh Grover

Hugh Grover: “Everybody living locally always wants to know what the market is doing…”*

Hugh Grover was born in Islington in 1964. His dad was a City surveyor whose ability to see the potential of the area when it was very run-down has given Hugh a special Islington connection. He’s also the man many remember as helping them get their first property – indeed he’s sold around 5,000 homes over the years. He still lives in the borough, near Canonbury station, while his sister is up the hill at Highbury. Hugh’s childhood memories start in N1 with Nanny R and her dog, Shaggy. From his window looking over the Arlingtons, an area of Georgian and early Victorian houses, he had fabulous spying opportunities. “I remember quite vividly every Thursday morning an old guy pushing a cart collecting rag and bones,” says Hugh at the glass conference table of his Upper Street agency, which he opened in May 1993. “When I was about six there was a massive fire at the paint factory. It was amazing. There were tonnes of fire engines. I thought we’d be asked to get out of the house…”

Close to the City
“Dad worked in the City in Paternoster Square,” says Hugh explaining his long Islington connection. “He leased a five storey house in St John Street from the council, converted it into flats, which he rented to his friends, and had a party room in the basement. When Finsbury Library was built the council CPOd (compulsory purchased) his house. With the money he then went and bought a bombsite on Coleman Fields.”

When Islington was dodgy
The Grover family lived in 9a Coleman Fields, but 9b had to be sold to finance the project. “Dad sold the flat to the Governor of the Bank of England who said ‘I’ll only buy it off you if you’ll buy it back for the same price.” I have to admit this story threw me – it seemed like generosity from a rich man, but Hugh puts me straight. “No, the Governor of the Bank of England was worried he’d lose money. Islington was regarded as the East End then…”

Hugh’s lived through Islington’s reputation change. He remembers window cleansers with flat hats, lots of antique traders in the shops on the high pavements and an operatic singing waiter at Porto Fino (one of a trio of amazing restaurants around Camden Passage in the1980s which included Aqualino, and the old favourite, Fredericks, which is still open). Holiday home For years the family has also had a rural bolt hole in Suffolk. “My mother was from Hadleigh Wood, north London, and was used to the countryside,” explains Hugh. “So my Dad decided when I was born to get a weekend cottage to cater for her needs.” Unfortunately as time passed things went wrong. “My parents split up when I was about 15. My mother and sister went to Highgate. I went to live in Barbican with my Dad,” he says. Hugh had been at boarding school in Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire but was keen to start work. He spent a year at Hatton Garden “working for some very orthodox Jews in the diamond trade.” He travelled too, and came home thinking, “what am I going to do?”  The City seemed an obvious answer. It was the 1980s after all.

“I had three big interviews with some money traders. The last interview was to test how much you could drink. I remember thinking how much I didn’t want to do a job that meant drinking at lunchtime,” says Hugh pointing out he’s happy to have a glass of wine or a beer, but not when it’s competitive.

“I came back so saddened from that interview. I didn’t want to work with them.  And I didn’t want to be a surveyor like my Dad. Something in me said go up to Upper Street and take your c/v. It was an area I knew and liked. I walked into four or five estate agents. I was 24 years old and lucky: I walked into Laurie Norman on the right day, at the right time. Laurie said have a chat with Philip Helman – who now works here at Hugh Grover. I just felt it was right.”

Hugh clearly enjoyed his six months working with Lawrie Norman. He was then head-hunted by Diana Matthews from Holden Matthews. “We had a fantastic team, I worked with Tim Carlton, we really expanded from 1987 -1991.” Hugh then joined Thomson Currie, a less happy experience, but on 5 May 1993 he set up his own company, the one with the familiar pink signs (and umbrellas).

Hugh Grover: "I go to Don Matteo for a sandwich and coffee. If ever I see my sister on a Sunday morning we buy coffee and croissants from Cinnamon Village on Blackstock Road."

Hugh Grover: “I go to Don Matteo for a sandwich and coffee. If ever I see my sister on a Sunday morning we buy coffee and croissants from Cinnamon Village on Blackstock Road.”

Hugh Grover on Islington

Islington has everything – Sadler’s Wells and the Almeida. I go to Vue Angel regularly with my daughter, Anna (who is six). As a child I used to go to Holloway Odeon, we called it the Flea Pit! I really enjoy the mixed community in Islington. It’s a shame it’s going. Highbury is still villagey, but Upper Street is becoming like every high street.

On cooking: I buy meat from Chris Godfrey – Sunday roast is my favourite. I also do a sea bass (bought from Steve Hatt) with sea salt all over it. See interviews with Chris Godfrey and Steve Hatt already published on islingtonfacesblog.com

It’s up for grabs now: I have lots of friends in Highbury. We meet in the Arsenal. My first ever game was at Highbury as a child. I loved the old ground – people had sat there for 60 years, they’d bring flasks. And I was in the second row at Anfield next to Niall Quinn when Michael Thomas scored the goal that won us the League (in 1988-89).

Selling houses
“Tony Blair put Islington on the map when he sold Richmond Crescent. People thought if the Prime Minister was living there… Now the quality of the applicant means most people are professionals – barristers, lawyers, bankers – who you can email and ask very direct questions. We can even ask for a bank statement to prove they have got the cash. With the market being so competitive it’s very easy to pick the right buyer.” It’s long been a cliché that house prices are always on the menu at Islington dinner parties – perhaps making Hugh the perfect guest. Clearly he doesn’t mind taking some work home with him, agreeing that, “everybody living locally always wants to know what the market is doing.” I wonder how many of his friends resist asking for a quickie valuation?

Selling may be serious, but Hugh enjoys a joke – his 2012 @inhughwetrust twitter identity saw him pretending to have beaten local boy Boris Johnson as Mayor of London. Hugh’s Youtube video even went viral – getting more than 7,500 views. Enjoy it here. http://youtu.be/U0ePbuMieZE

Hugh Grover branded umbrellas - just in case it rains when you are house hunting.

Hugh Grover branded umbrellas – just in case it rains when you are house hunting.

Passing it on
“One of the things I like to do is have teenagers, who’ve grown up locally, work on Saturdays with us. A Saturday job builds the boys’ confidence, something I feel I learnt at boarding school. We have had more than 10 young employees over the years. Some have been very shy, but we help them make a success, and they always keep in touch.”

Hugh has also found other ways to help teens. He is on the board of the King’s Corner Project  (a youth project for 13-21 year olds near Old Street) and his company sponsors the City & Islington College FdA, also using the students photography on its website, see here.

Hugh Grover is a lucky man: someone who loves selling houses and is a huge fan of his home borough’s club. How good is it then to be born in Islington at the right time to enjoy its massive surge in popularity? Or to live so close to the Emirates Stadium? Admittedly the Arsenal trophy cupboard has been a bit bare for the past few years, but the memories of that Michael Thomas goal at Anfield and the most recent Double* (2001-02) remain strong.

Words*

House prices in Islington (2013) – taken from Right Move websiteLast year most property sales in Islington involved flats which sold for on average £460,523. Terraced properties sold for an average price of £1,131,161, while semi-detached properties fetched £1,269,058.

Islington, with an overall average price of £574,494, was similar in terms of sold prices to nearby Highbury (£585,652), but was cheaper than Canonbury (£738,190) and Barnsbury (£719,545).

During the last year, sold prices in Islington were 12% up on the previous year and 17% up on 2011 when the average house price was £491,885.

Arsenal won the Double – when you win the Premier League and the FA cup – for Gunners fans these golden moments were 1997-98 and 2001-02.

Over to you
Would you like to nominate someone to be interviewed? Or would you like to write a guest post for this blog? if the answer is yes for either please email nicolabaird.green@gmail.com

If you’d like to feature on this blog, or make a suggestion about anyone who grew up, lives or works in Islington please let me know, via nicolabaird.green@gmail.com. Thank you. 

If you liked this interview please SHARE on twitter or Facebook. Even better follow islingtonfacesblog.com (see menu top right), @nicolabairduk

This blog is inspired by Spitalfields Life written by the Gentle Author.

If you enjoyed this post you might like to look at the A-Z  index, or the A-Z of jobs to find friends, neighbours and inspiration. Thanks for stopping by. Nicola

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